Health Nutrition
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Every Canadian loves maple syrup. We put it on pancakes, in oatmeal, slather it on our bacon–but most of us wouldn’t think of using the stuff to treat chronic medical conditions.

Well it turns out we might one day be able to.

Researchers at Université Laval found that a newly-discovered molecule in maple syrup has anti-inflammatory properties. Aptly named “quebecol”, the molecule is a result of chemical reactions that take place during the syrup-making process.

“Arthritis and other inflammatory diseases could someday be treated with medication containing a molecule from maple syrup,” researchers wrote.

Anti-inflammatories reduce swelling and pain caused by injuries or disease. Unfortunately though, chugging a bottle won’t do much for you. Because there is so little quebecol in maple syrup, more science will be needed to concentrate it in just the right amounts to provide a medicinal effect. Which basically means it’ll be a while before we see any maple-syrup based medications on the market.

But hey, at least the next time you pour that stuff all over your breakfast, you can know you might be doing your body just a little bit of a favour.
 
WATCH: Now smother maple syrup all over these delicious breakfasts


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