Life Food
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When you go to the grocery store, you probably do your best to ensure that everything most things you put in your cart are healthy.

Some people do that by buying organic, others by scanning the ingredients list. But a lot of us simply look for the word “natural” on food labels as some small assurance that our product isn’t coated in chemicals or artificial nastiness. In fact, most of the people who buy food products carrying that “natural” label believe the item contains no pesticides, no artificial ingredients and no genetically modified organisms.

Well, guess what? The term “natural” doesn’t mean squat. It’s literally a word companies slap on a package to make a product seem more wholesome, but it’s completely unregulated and actually means nothing.

“Without oversight or a legal definition, the ‘natural’ label can be little more than a marketing tool that can fool consumers,” Urvashi Rangan from Consumer Reports said.

So what labels can you trust? The “organic” label is regulated by the government. And if a package says the product is “100 per cent whole wheat”, for example, then it is in fact entirely made of whole wheat. Packages that say “contains” whole wheat are probably the ones you should consider putting back on the shelf.

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