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On Thursday, the United Nations assembly voted on a resolution to condemn the United States’ (read: Donald Trump’s) decision earlier this month to move their Israeli embassy to Jerusalem. While the gesture was largely symbolic — the UN can’t tell a sovereign nation where to put their embassy — it could have long lasting effects on international relations, especially those between the U.S. and their allies. Countries voted overwhelmingly in favour of condemning the decision with 128 for and nine against. Thirty-five countries, including Canada, abstained from the vote, fearing repercussions from their largest ally. Another 21 didn’t show up to the assembly at all, supposedly for the same reason. They were right to be concerned.

Before the vote took place, statements from the American president made it abundantly clear that anyone choosing to vote against the U.S. would face some consequences. On Wednesday, he said “Let them vote against us; we’ll save a lot,” implying that the U.S. would revoke funds previously pledged to U.N. initiatives and other countries. The American ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley also took to Twitter to say the U.S. would be “taking names” during the vote. Considering that the U.S. is arguably the most powerful country in the world, that’s a pretty grave threat.

The U.S. decision to move their embassy is problematic because it takes a stance on a long-fought battle between Israel and Palestine who both claim ownership of Jerusalem and name it as their capital. Historically, other countries have stayed out of the conflict and refused to recognize either state’s ownership. Donald Trump’s order to move the embassy is something that has been on the books in America since the days of Bill Clinton, but every president since then has postponed the move for national security reasons and for fear of ratcheting up tensions in the area. Well, tensions are certainly ratcheted now.

At the vote, Haley reminded everyone present just how damaging the repercussions for their actions could be. She pointed out again that the U.S. is the primary contributor to the U.N. both financially and by number of personnel. Without American contributions, there is no United Nations. Haley said that the U.S. would “remember this day” when they were “singled out for attack.”

“We do this because it represents who we are… when we make generous contributions to the U.N. we also have a legitimate expectation that our goodwill is recognized, ” she said, “If our investment fails, we have an obligation to spend our resources in more productive ways.” Haley added that this vote would not curtail the U.S.’s plan to move the embassy.

“America will put our embassy in Jerusalem,” she said, “No vote in the United Nations will make any difference on that. But this vote will make a difference on how Americans look at the U.N. and on how we look at countries who disrespect us in the U.N.”

It feels like we’re in that tense point in a movie where the big power blatantly threatens everyone else and you go “That sounds cool but it would be so weird if someone said that in real life.” Except this is real life, and someone did just said that. At least Canada is on the “appreciated” list for now.