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With the holidays quickly approaching (and the bevy of booze-based beverages that often accompany them), more and more of us are opting for paid rides to and from our party destinations. And thanks to the high fees now associated with cabs, Uber has quickly become the ride-sharing program of choice for those of us who want a cheaper alternative.

But in no universe would anyone consider taking an $18,000 Uber ride — for an eight-kilometre trek no less — a cheaper alternative. Not even when you take into account the “surge” pricing that the company charges during particularly busy hours. In fact, that kind of fee is more in line with what a person commissioning a private jet would expect to pay… and the ride would probably still be longer.

So that’s why it’s not hard to imagine how shocked a Toronto man was when he got in his Uber recently and travelled 20 minutes from the east side of town to the west side, only to look down at his app at the end of the ride and see that he had been charged exactly $18,518.50 for the experience.

Yeah, that driver probably didn’t get a tip.

To be fair, errors like this are bound to happen every now and again (also, can we all just agree that having a credit limit that high is impressive?). But when the man tried to contact the company, they reportedly stopped responding to his queries and refused to reverse the charges, prompting his friend to post about the experience on social media for help.


Naturally, various outlets in Canada and even some in the States jumped on the news. That’s when customer service stepped in to not only reverse the charges, but a spokesperson revealed that the company is also reviewing its customer service policies for cases like this.

“There was an error here and it has been resolved,” the person told Slate. “We have provided a full refund to this rider and apologized to him for this experience. We have safeguards in place to help prevent something like this from happening, and we are working to understand how this occurred.”

Well that’s a relief. And at $18,000 a pop, Uber would go out of business pretty quickly.

At least now we can rest assured knowing that as long as you’re willing to go to the media for a bit of help, no one will be paying $2,250 per kilometre for a car ride, even during peak hours.

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