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Many people need emotional support from animals, and nowadays, it isn’t uncommon to see therapy dogs and cats walking around with their humans. Although any domesticated living creature — including rabbits, mice, hedgehogs, rats, ferrets, pigs and birds — could be therapeutic to a person, these emotional support pets are accommodated far less than service animals.

According to airline blog Live and Let’s Fly, United Airlines refused to let a woman bring her emotional support peacock on a flight departing Newark Liberty International Airport — even though she bought the massive, majestic bird its own seat.

“This animal did not meet guidelines for a number of reasons, including its weight and size,” a United Airlines’ spokesperson told Fox News. “We explained this to the customers on three separate occasions before they arrived at the airport.”

Travel talk show The Jet Set posted photos of the situation on their Facebook page, and it sparked all kinds of debate about the woman’s peacock, Dexter.

Facebook
Facebook/The Jet Set

Some argued that it may have been critical to the owner’s health and wanted to give her the benefit of the doubt. But for the most part, people were not having it and believe the idea of a peacock on a flight is absurd.

There were those who disagreed with emotional support animals, as a whole.


Though some “defended” them…

 

…one was dead set against peacocks on planes.

One woman in particular was never a fan of the giant birds.

 

For the first time in a long time, we’re guessing many were siding with the airline on this because, come ON. Even positioned perfectly on a seat, a peacock doesn’t exactly fit conveniently into an economy-level chair. And if it’s in an aisle seat, imagine Dexter’s tail hitting you as you walked past it to go to the washroom. Nope.

Getting rejected by United was probably the best solution for everyone — not just the passengers and the woman, but for Dexter’s comfort level too. After six hours of trying to get on the flight, to no avail, she found some friends to drive her to her destination. Now, a road trip with a peacock… what could go wrong?