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Vancouver’s SkyTrain: It’s state of the art. Tucked away deep within the confines of TransLink’s computer room is the secret to what keeps those driverless trains running all day long. They’re high tech, and they’re revolutionary. The infamous secret technology behind SkyTrains is – wait for it – a series of Pentium one computers backed up by floppy disks. That’s right. Floppy. Freaking. Disks. In fact, here’s a live shot of their core processor now:

While most of us have already rendered that old technology obsolete (like, 10 years ago), floppy disks are still used for booting and backing up TransLink’s system. Of course, this knowledge might upset some of its riders, especially after many of them were struck in a 5-hour delay last month that’s still being investigated. We’ll give you folks a second to rage out…

Now here’s the catch 22: One of the breakdowns last month was actually caused by a newer system. And upgrading the entire technological fleet could cost up to $50 million, while leaving it open to new kinds of errors. “[The computer] may be old, but it’s very reliable,” SkyTrain Maintenance VP Sun Fang says in the video above. “It doesn’t need a lot of memory.” In other words, the tried and true technology seems to be paying off here. And shelling out $50 million for upgrades? Well, my friends, that just doesn’t compute.