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Drop the salt shaker and hold the sodium. In case you didn’t already get the memo, salt’s even worse for us than we thought it was.

A study out of the U.S. National Library of Medicine just confirmed that salt can lead to premature death, so it’s probably time to start cutting down on it a bit more than usual. We’re certainly not condemning the use of salt in general (after all, our body needs a certain amount to function each day). But we are saying that too much is officially a no-no for the sake of your body.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Nancy Cook, examined around 3,000 people between ages 30 and 54 who were on different low sodium diets, and found that for every 1,000 mg cut in salt regularly, there was a 12 per cent lower chance of having a premature death. Those who had under 2,300 mg of sodium each day had the lowest risk.

“Low sodium is better. It reduces blood pressure, it reduces cardiovascular disease and it reduces rates of death due to any cause,” said Cook. “Going below 2,300 [mg] is good for you, going further below that, the evidence isn’t really that strong.”

And considering that adult Canadians have an average of 3,400 mg of salt each day, cutting your daily salt intake to 2,300 mg isn’t an impossible feat.

Even if you don’t count the exact amount of salt you have each day, don’t worry too much–just be cautious to not go overboard with how much salt your eating. Like practically all foods, anything is okay in moderation.