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Remember that plastic skeleton your high school biology teacher would use to demonstrate the route food took as it passed through your digestive system? She would point with the metre-stick, throw around some science-y words like “peristalsis” or “duodenum,” and you’d just have to imagine what it all looked like.

Not anymore! (Warning: You may want to put down your lunch before you watch the video, above.)

In this informative — if a bit off-putting — video from National Geographic, high-definition cameras go where no one has asked them to go, capturing the voyage of food through the digestive system, starting in the mouth and ending in the rectum.

You’ll see peristalsis in all its squishy, pink glory; glimpse a bolus (a ball of chewed food) drop into the stomach before being churned and squeezed by the stomach walls; stare into the squinting eye of the pyloric sphincter; and then watch as what was once breakfast passes through the small and then large intestines before being handed off as waste.

This is certainly not for the squeamish — it’s all a bit like a scene by David Cronenberg, especially with the accompanying sound effects — but you’ll learn more from this five-minute video than that plastic skeleton ever taught you.