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It’s easy to forget the power of makeup sometimes – it’s so much more than just a way to gloss over a breakout or to feel extra special for a night out. When used deliberately, it can be a powerful tool of self-empowerment, creativity and self-love, and it’s great to be reminded of that once in a while.

Beauty blogger Paige Billiot recently posted a video showing her transforming her facial birthmark into a pretty mesmerizing work of art. Instead of using makeup to disguise or conceal her natural birthmark, she actually highlights it, using it as the centrepiece of her look.

It’s all part of her ‘Flawless Affect’ campaign, which aims to challenge conventional beauty standards, and advocates that “your flaws are what make you flawless.” It’s great to see people courageously taking to the internet to share themselves openly and honestly, and in so doing, giving others permission to do the same.


It reminds us of Instagrammer Ash Soto, who embraced her Vitiligo and turned it into beautiful maps on her body:

A post shared by ASH SOTO (@radiantbambi) on

And maybe you caught the story of Matt Tronconi, who used the power of makeup to help his mom with a condition known as KTS, which causes swollen limbs and port-wine stains on the body. His mom Joanne had a powerful message for anyone watching, saying “who you are is good enough,” and in the video they playfully mess around with different makeup looks, accentuating, rather than hiding Joanne’s features:

Meanwhile, Paige is sharing more of her makeup experimentation over on her Insta, and you can check out the original vid, shared by PopSugar, below:

It’s great to see that makeup, instead of being used as a tool to promote conformity, or a sense of having to hide your natural self, can be used in just the opposite way. It’s a sight to see, and we’re all for it.