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Oh hey there, fellow Game of Thrones (Sundays at 9 p.m. ET on Crave) lovers. If you tuned into Sunday night’s “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms” then you know we were all witnessing the calm before the storm that’s about to ravage Winterfell, and like us, you were probably there for every hot minute of it.

And we do mean hot. Between a steamy hookup, a group of misfits warming by the fire, a big homecoming hug and a certain fighter finally getting her due… well, a lot quietly happened in the episode.

Talking about it at the watercooler this week? Here are your Coles Notes on what you need to know to stay in the conversation.

What to say the next time someone wants to play spin-the-bottle at a party:

Let’s play knight-the-warrior instead.

Brienne of Tarth is one of the most badass fighters we’ve ever seen on the series, yet because of a traditional old rule she wasn’t allowed to be officially knighted. Pish, said Jaime, who owed a lot more than his one-handed status to Brienne after she stuck up for him against Sansa and Daenerys at the top of the episode.

And so as he, Tormund, Tyrion, Davos, and Pod sat by the fire contemplating life for what could very well be the last time, Jaime decided to take the Seven Kingdoms into his own hand and knight Brienne then and there. Is it legal or lasting? Who knows. But it was one of the most empowering female moments on the series, and it solidified our stance as Team Braime—all the way.

Wait, Brienne, Jaime and Tormund were in the same room together?

Oh yeah, that happened. It was probably as close to a “love triangle” as this show will ever get, too.

TBH, watching Tormund posturing in front of Jaime was one of the night’s biggest highlights. Brienne was having none of it, of course, but Tormund comparing himself, the Giantsbane, to the “King-Killer” Jaime was priceless. Especially when he talked about growing strong by drinking Giant’s milk, and then downing a flask and getting it all over his beard.

That guy puts the “ass” in “class” and we hope he never changes.

How did Jaime get so comfortable at Winterfell? What about Bran?

Well it definitely helped that Brienne stuck up for Jaime with Sansa, but Bran keeping quiet was also a pretty big part of Jaime being welcomed into the fold. He knows there are bigger fish to fry with this supernatural war and all, and he said as much to an apologetic Jaime later on in the Godswood.

Oh the things we do for love.

You mentioned a homecoming hug?

Right. Remember Theon Greyjoy? You know, the guy who pretended to kill Bran and Rickon, only to be captured and castrated by Ramsay Bolton? Oh, he also betrayed—and then saved—his sister along the way. Yeah, that guy.

So he finally got back to Winterfell after freeing Yara. She sailed home to recapture the Iron Island for Dany, and he returned to fight for Winterfell, his childhood home. After all of the awful things he’s done it’s easy to forget that he basically grew up with the Starks, making him like a brother to Sansa. A brother who helped her escape from Ramsay, BTW. So when he walked through the doors, she had a big old hug ready for the guy. Naturally.

Speaking of Sansa, what’s the latest on her and Daenerys?

Oh man, if this season were more than six episodes we could spend a lot of time digging into that relationship. Obviously the women don’t trust each other, but they have a lot in common too. They got into all of that during a little heart-to-heart in the middle of the episode, when Dany was PO’d at Tyrion for believing Cersei would send help. (As if.)

The conversation didn’t really resolve anything, but now Dany knows The North isn’t ready to bend the knee to her and her fire-breathing dragons just because Jon Snow says it’s a good idea. They’re still looking for some kind of Brexit deal here, and should everyone live that could become important.

What to say when your bestie’s boy crushes on your little daughter:

Arya Stark is all grown up.

While Sansa was dealing with Dany and welcoming Theon back, Arya went and got herself some on Sunday night. And with Robert Baratheon’s bastard Gendry, of all people. (Remember when Arya’s dad and Gendry’s dads were besties? You know, back in season one before the Seven Kingdoms exploded into a war zone?)

If you needed more proof that Arya (and actress Maisie Williams) is no longer the 14-year-old we met in 2011, her shedding her clothes and telling Gendry to unzip his own pants should do it. We know, it’s hard to stop looking at her as a little girl, but the woman is 22 now. It’s time.

Besides, you can’t blame “A Girl” for wanting to lose her v-card the night before the world possibly ends. Especially when the heat between those two has been steamier than the fires Gendry keeps blacksmithing by. We should also note the way Arya seduced Gendry is kind of a big deal—the ladies at Winterfell haven’t always been so in control of their sexuality. (Let’s please not get into that awful Sansa-Ramsay rape scene again though.)

So who else got it on?

Other than Tormund and his giant’s milk?

Well, definitely not Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow. Or should we say Aegon Targaryen? Learning that you’re related kind of kills the spark. Also, Jon’s confession to Dany in front of his mother’s crypt came with a whole side of denial. The Mother of Dragons has a point—learning you have a claim to the throne through your brother and bestie seems a touch shady, no matter how true it is. But with the White Walkers just minutes away, the potential rulers really didn’t have time to delve into a history lesson or figure out whose tush would be more comfortable on the Iron Throne.

Yes—the White Walkers. Finally we’re getting to the good stuff.

Indeed. This episode was definitely another setup episode, which is slightly disappointing because we know that after this there are only four episodes left and SO. MUCH. STORY. to get through. But next week we’ve got a raging 90-minutes of battle, so there’s action on the horizon. Besides, let’s just all appreciate that this could be the last time we spend with some of our favourite characters.

It wasn’t lost on us that just as Podrick sang his little ditty we flashed over Arya and Gendry, Sansa and Theon, Grey Worm and Missandei, Sam and Gilly, and Jon and Dany. These characters—and in some cases couples—are about to be ripped apart, both physically and literally.

Oh yeah that song. What was up with that?

At this point in the series we don’t liken many plot points to George RR Martin’s books anymore, but “Jenny’s Song” is actually pretty important to the overall mythology of the series and the origins of the characters.

Long story short, it’s a song about Dany’s uncle, Duncan Targaryen, who gave up the Iron Throne for love when he married Jenny of Oldstones. It all ended in disaster and they both died in a great fire, but the song could be foreshadowing Jon and/or Dany giving up the throne out of love.

If we get there. As we saw in the closing seconds of the episode, the White Walkers have arrived at Winterfell, and things are about to get deadly.

Any predictions on who will die?

We can’t even go there. Our hearts won’t allow us. All we know is that the children and certain characters should be safe down in the crypts. We say “should” because our characters may be overlooking one important thing about the Night King: he kind of uses the dead as a part of his army. What if, when he breaks through to Winterfell, he somehow resurrects all of those dead Starks? Well that would not be good for a group of defenseless women and children.

Also, seeing a White Walking Ned Stark? Yep, if that happens we’re losing it.

And now we’re all caught up.

Game of Thrones streams Sundays at 9 p.m. ET on Crave.