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In 2011, Canada put a ban on Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical compound — but only on children’s plastic cups and baby bottles. BPA is still on multiple products including plastic bottles, food cans, and even store receipts! (Think about how many times a day you touch those.)

And while the powers-that-be thought that they’d protected young children from the effects of BPA, it turns out that Canada’s kids are “awash” with BPA; up to 93 per cent of 6 – 19-year-olds have detectable levels of BPA in their urine.

There are questions about the long-term effects of BPA exposure. One study found that BPA levels in children were connected to higher hyperactivity in girls and more antisocial behaviour in boys.

Unsurprisingly, the chemical industry says BPA is safe at low doses. Researchers say it’s not, that it acts like a hormone and can impact a child’s developing brain. Deborah Kurrasch, a researcher at the University of Calgary, says “These developments further strengthen the argument — there is something happening here and we need to pay attention to it.”

Some European nations are considering a widespread ban, and many researchers want Canada to follow suit.

Watch the video, above, for more information.

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