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We all know how amazing Malala Yousafzai is. The Nobel Prize laureate is a wise, compelling, incomparable force who could’ve easily been silenced but she, instead, speaks loudly, clearly and passionately for females everywhere.

We also know how brilliant Emma Watson is. And that was only punctuated further after the actress addressed gender equality and the misconceptions about feminism as part of her U.N. Women Goodwill Ambassador gig.

Now put them together and what you’ve got is the most eloquent, inspiring, badass dynamic duo. Yes even more dynamic than Jen and Amy.

Emma interviewed Malala at the Into Film Festival and, frankly, it was more amazing that any of us could’ve hoped for. They tackled an array of topics including Yousafzai’s life, advocacy, and the documentary He Named Me Malala, which was playing at the festival. But it was when the conversation turned to feminism that things really got good.

In a Facebook post of their interview, Emma wrote about just how impressive Malala is. Watson initially wanted to ask Yousafzai if she identified as a feminist, but decided to take out the question a day before the interview. But Malala brought up the word herself (as she spoke of her amazing father, self-professed feminist Ziauddin, who she calls an “example to all men”) and credited Emma with the descriptor.

“It has been a tricky word. When I heard it the first time I heard some negative responses and some positive ones,” she told Watson. “I hesitated in saying, ‘Am I feminist or not?'”

Malala continued: “Then after your speech, ‘If not now, when? If not me, who?” I decided there’s nothing wrong with calling yourself a feminist. So I am a feminist and we should all be feminists because feminism is another word for equality.”

Watson was moved that it was her words that could inspire and who wouldn’t be? To be someone who inspires the inspirational Malala is something Emma should take to heart.

These two. The fact that Emma brings out something in Malala is one thing but the way Malala busts out the word and recalls the moment when she, herself, realized that she is one is simply wonderful. Yousafzai defines it so articulately and so poignantly that it should be the wake-up call everyone needs when tiptoeing around the F word.

Today I met Malala. She was giving, utterly graceful, compelling and intelligent. That might sound obvious but I was…

Posted by Emma Watson on Wednesday, November 4, 2015