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What really inspires children to strive for a higher education? According a recent study, it sure isn’t homework.

Nope, the study, published in the Journal of Youth Studies, suggests the answer is some good old QT with the ‘rents.

“Emotional closeness to parents and cultural capital (e.g. participating in cultural events, discussing books) were better predictors of 10-to 15-year-olds’ aspirations than were more school-driven parent–child interactions (e.g. homework, extra-curricular activities),” said Dr Dimitra Hartas, the study’s lead at the University of Warwick.

So, basically, it suggests that the more quality time children spend with their parents doing adult-ish things, the more likely they will be to continue education after the age of 16.

This isn’t the first time a study has pointed in this anti-homework direction. Heck, Finland has all but banished homework from their school systems and their students are doing just fine.

We’re certainly not afraid to call it (homework) like it is: we hated doing homework, we hate doing our kids’ homework and we’d much rather take a trip to Machu Picchu to help inspire them please and thank you.

So might this be the beginning of the end for homework? We wouldn’t be too sad, and it would definitely make for a good story when we’re old.

Imagine telling your grandchildren decades from now, “when I was young, we had to do school work AFTER school was over.”

“Sure, school work at home. You’re crazy, Grandma.”

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