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When the trailer for Netflix’s Bright starring Will Smith was first released in the early fall, it looked like it was going to be an incredible social commentary with heart, humour and fairy tale characters. The vibes we got were Lord of the Rings meets every ’80s buddy cop movie with a little Get Out thrown in — just what we needed to wrap up 2017.

The premise looked great, too: in an alternate present-day where mythical creatures exist alongside humans, Will Smith is a cop who gets partnered up with the squad’s new guy — the first orc to ever join the police department. There’s action, there’s racial allegory, there’s (we assume) a commentary on the systemic oppression of minorities in Western culture. It even looked like an Oscar-contender in our — admittedly amateur — opinion. Except that’s not how things panned out for the film. In fact, it’s kind of universally hated.

Netflix spent a whopping $90 million on Bright, rolled it out like a big-budget blockbuster film and ordered a sequel before it was even available for streaming on Dec. 22. That was all pretty gutsy, considering it’s now being called by critics and Twitter-users alike “the worst movie of 2017.” Need we remind you that this year was also the year of The Emoji Movie. Yeah, that’s how much people don’t like this film.

One unsatisfied customer was Chance The Rapper. The artist sent out a series of tweets the day after Christmas asking for his followers’ opinions on the movie. He focused on what he deemed a problematic exploration of race relations in the film — a common critique in the reviews. He also pointed out that the similarity between real-life racism and Bright‘s racial undertones mean that the comparisons made in the film can’t be ignored or dismissed as just entertainment or coincidence.

There were, of course, some individuals who enjoyed the movie, regardless of the majority’s opinion. In fact, between those people who genuinely want to see it, the people who want to see what all the fuss is about and the people who watch ironically, this movie might actually end up being successful by financial standards. (All publicity is good publicity, right Mr. President?)