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If you’re eating anything while reading this, you might want to put it down, because this new tourist destination in Sweden is straight up designed to turn your stomach.

The Disgusting Food Museum, opening in Malmo, Sweden on October 29, is an institution that showcases some of the most repulsive things real people regularly and intentionally put in their mouths. The attraction was developed by Samuel West, who also created the Museum of Failure in Helsingborg, Sweden, which showcases some of the biggest product flops of all time. (The Museum of Failure went on a global tour this year and made its only Canadian stop in Toronto in September.)

“They’re both fun, but the food museum is much more relatable and much more interactive,” West told Swedish news site The Local. “You can only sniff failure to a certain extent. But if you have rotten shark in your face you wish you were never born.

Have you pushed yourself away from the table yet? Because here’s what’s on the menu at the Disgusting Food Museum:

Bull penis:

Mouse wine:

mouse-wine

Maggot cheese:

Maggot cheese, AKA casu marzu

Other not-so-appetizing foods include cuy (barbecued guinea pig commonly served in Peru), hakarl (shark meat that’s been buried and fermented for five months and eaten by folks in Iceland; it’s said to smell like a mix of fish and ammonia), durian (the world’s stinkiest fruit) and “Sardinian Viagra” (cheese literally made in the stomach of a baby goat).

Beyond crinkled noses and raised eyebrows, the museum, which will run until the end of January 2019, is also supposed to make people think about what they eat and why, because the environment may depend on it.

“We need to question our ideas of disgust if we’re going to consider some of the more environmentally friendly sources of protein, like insects,” West said.

But a handful of dried and salted crickets is one thing. Cheese made by maggots? Not on our nachos.

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