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As teenagers, we thought we knew everything. At the time we believed, no one had ever, in the whole history of forever, had thought the thoughts that were running through our cocky little heads. Our issues and beliefs were just sooo profound. We didn’t know just how egotistical we sounded (and were) because, well, why would we? We were already legends in our own minds and no one could tell us any different.

willow

We were talking about ourselves, but we could easily be talking about Jaden and Willow Smith. At 16 and 14, respectively, the siblings revealed in an interview with The New York Times that school is depressing and a giant waste of time, and they are going to change the world through the force of their own personalities. They are supremely confident in their abilities, moan and groan about the universe and everything they have been told and taught — or learned and read on their own — is how it is. We’ve heard it all before. Hell, we might have uttered similar sentiments ourselves.

Aaaand, then again, maybe we haven’t:

JADEN: There’s a theoretical physicist inside all of our minds, and you can talk and talk, but it’s living.
WILLOW: And the feeling of being like, this is a fragment of a holographic reality that a higher consciousness made.

Yeah, never said that.

JADEN: Honestly, we’re just trying to make music that we think is cool. We don’t think a lot of the music out there is that cool.

Ok, yeah.

JADEN: When babies are born, their soft spots bump: It has, like, a heartbeat in it. That’s because energy is coming through their body, up and down.
WILLOW: Prana energy.
JADEN: It’s prana energy because they still breathe through their stomach. They remember. Babies remember.
WILLOW: When they’re in the stomach, they’re so aware, putting all their bones together, putting all their ligaments together. But they’re shocked by this harsh world.

Um, no, no, no and no.

WILLOW: I went to school for one year. It was the best experience but the worst experience. The best experience because I was, like, “Oh, now I know why kids are so depressed.” But it was the worst experience because I was depressed.

Ok, we’re with you on that.

jaden

Perhaps it’s the fame, the celebrity talking and if that’s the case, we can’t fault them. Aside from being philosophical, wise-beyond-their-years special snowflakes, it’s great that they are thinking (coherently or not, you be the judge); that’s what teens years are for. It can be a dreamy, somewhat spiritual time and maybe one day, their social insights and precious nuggets of banality will become clear.

Or who knows? In a few years, the Smith kids might look back and re-read their interview with the New York Times and be all, “What was I thinking?” And instead of spouting off sentences like Sheldon Cooper (or McConaughey or Shia), they’ll sound like Cher Horowitz. Whatever the case, at least these kids are dreamers who are looking at the bigger picture. How many of us can say we were doing that when we were teenagers?

leonard