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Planes without windows, it sounds insane right?

At first glance, you’d think this is the airline industry’s attempt at sucking the last ounce of humanity out of long-distance travel. With tighter seats and crappier food, windows were always taken for granted. Kind of like oxygen (which we’re sure they’ll start charging for eventually).

But this idea isn’t as wacky as it seems. Heck, you might even like it.

The windows on airplanes wouldn’t just be boarded up, forcing passengers to dwell in the dark. They would be replaced with flexible, OLED screens that actually line the walls of the aircraft. This creates the illusion that you’re flying in a transparent bubble, only this bubble can play movies, show points of interest in the country you’re flying to, access the internet and provide views of the outside.

View of the outside
A sample view from inside the aircraft. Not too shabby, eh?

Passengers sitting in the window seat can pick their view via touch screen interface, while those in the middle and aisle seats can use the screen affixed to the headrest in front of them. There, they can access in-flight services, or just turn the screens off if they want to take a quick power nap. The Daily Mail reports that the new technology will even fight jet lag, as passengers can control colour changes associated with sunrise and sunset.

Windowless planes are coming, but would you ride in them?

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), which works with developers across the UK, recently unveiled a video showing concept art for its new creation. The video explains that the installation of airplane windows requires the fuselage to be strengthened, adding weight to the aircraft as well as higher fuel costs. When you take those windows out of the equation, the company boasts that it can create planes that are lighter, stronger and larger; that translates to wider seats for passengers, less fuel consumption and a reduced carbon footprint.

The most shocking surprise at all? CPI says its windowless planes could be produced for roughly the same cost as an average windowed one. The technology could be ready in as little as 10 years.

So what do you think, is this a great idea? Or the start of horribly oppressive aviation? Let us know below:


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