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Muslim women who choose to wear a hijab are often subjected to scrutiny and, sadly, outbursts of racism in many parts of the world. Questions about their head wear can range from the curious to the insulting. One woman has decided to have some fun with a question she often hears, specifically, ‘what’s under your hijab?’ Her answer is brilliant.

The clip has now been shared on the Instagram page Muslim Girl, with the post already earning almost 32,000 views in three days. The video has struck a chord with many Muslim women who have commented and applauded the woman for poking fun at a question many women face on a daily basis.


The Muslim Girl Instagram page tends to veer towards a more serious tone, using the platform to inspire its 79,000 followers and educate them about Muslim women participating in feminist movements throughout the world. For some, the hijab is a choice of modesty. According to The Conversation, many Muslim women “choose to wear the hijab as a way of showing self-control, power and agency.”

In recent years, there have been some strides to incorporate the hijab more into mainstream media and fashion. On the current season of Grey’s Anatomy, actor Sophia Taylor Ali plays Dr. Dahlia Qadri, a Muslim woman who wears a hijab. Nike has recently introduced a performance hijab for athletes, with the first ad for the product modelled by American Olympic fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad, Emirati figure skater Zahra Lari and German boxer Zeina Nassar. Muhammad was also chosen to be part of Mattel’s latest Shero collection, with the Olympian receiving her own Barbie doll.

By featuring models wearing hijabs in magazines and major ad campaigns, as well as characters in film and television shows, there is hope that women who choose to wear the hijab will face fewer questions about their choice of head-covering when out in public.