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If you’ve ever been to a major league baseball game, then you know the area around the stadium is the stuff of nightmares. Thousands of people milling around, generally walking in the same direction you are, not to mention parents making sure they don’t get separated from their kids, and others in a rush to catch a train or a taxi out of there; it’s enough to make anyone feel a little panicky and claustrophobic.

All Yusef Dale was trying to do was hail a cab, but being visually impaired wasn’t helping his cause. Dale had just attended a Chicago Cubs game and with the streets and sidewalks packed with fans leaving the game, it was chaotic and loud and tough for him to get his bearings. That’s when Casey Spellman stepped in.

Spellman, who was visiting from Indianapolis, helped flag down a car for Dale and waited with him until one pulled up and he was safely inside. A sweet gesture that went unnoticed by many, but thankfully caught Ryan Hamilton‘s eye. He captured the whole thing and posted it on Facebook.

“Wanted to give a shout-out to this girl. No idea who she is, but we are in Wrigleyville on the rooftop of Old Crow Smokehouse,” read Hamilton’s caption of the photos. “There was a blind Cubs fan trying to hail a cab for several minutes until the lady came up and asked him if he needed help hailing a cab. She stood there with him until one pulled up. Awesome to see such kindness in a world that the media portrays so much hate in. Share freely in hopes that her kindness spreads.”

WGN9 News spoke to Dale, an assistant U.S. attorney, who said his friend called to tell him he was all over the news. Dale acknowledged that because of all the noise, it made for hailing a cab “difficult,” so when Spellman offered her assistance, he accepted because she approached him in the most perfect way.

“She did not presume that I was incompetent or unable,” he told WGN9 News. “She didn’t get into my personal space. Most important, she didn’t grab me or touch me without me even knowing who she was, which is a common refrain you hear from people with disabilities.”

At the cab, they exchanged goodbyes without knowing the other’s name, and it would’ve been a quietly sweet gesture if Hamilton hadn’t shared their story. But thankfully he did. Our hope? That these moments actually happen all the time; they just aren’t captured on social media. Because people are kind, kinder than we’ve been used to seeing as of late. Right?