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In case you haven’t been following the Harvey Weinstein sexual assault and harassment reports–there have been a lot–Rose McGowan is one of the actresses who came forward in that original New York Times expose. She told the Times that she was raped by Weinstein at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival and he later paid her a settlement of $100,000.

Since the initial NYT article, many more women have come forward to tell their stories of harassment at the hands of Weinstein. It has also come out that Weinstein’s behaviour was well-known among the Hollywood elite for decades. Over the past few days, McGowan has called out several people who she told about the assault, but refused to help her.

Yesterday, however, her Twitter account was suspended for 12 hours because she ‘violated the Twitter rules.’ Though the company claimed in a series of tweets that the action was taken because McGowan included someone’s private number in a tweet, the timing was suspicious. When a woman speaking out about rape on a platform is abruptly silenced for a technicality, we have reason to be a little skeptical. As she later pointed out: the president is allowed to threaten North Korea with nuclear war, but she couldn’t call out people who were complicit in serial sexual assault?

TWITTER HAS SUSPENDED ME. THERE ARE POWERFUL FORCES AT WORK. BE MY VOICE. #ROSEARMY #whywomendontreport

A post shared by Rose McGowan (@rosemcgowan) on

McGowan’s account has since been unlocked, but she’s leading a mass boycott of the website in protest. #WomenBoycottTwitter was picked up worldwide by Twitter users, including celebrities. Chrissy Teigen, Gabriel Union, Kerry Washington and Gina Rodriguez have all tweeted their support (before going silent, of course). Some men like Mark Ruffalo and Terry Crews also expressed solidarity and said they too would remain silent for the day.

With all those voices off for the day though, the common opinion of the women left on Twitter is that silencing one’s self is not an effective way to protest being silenced. Women spending a day off Twitter means that for an entire day, there is no female perspective on the site. Women bring discussion and essential criticism to the table and removing that doesn’t seem productive. Women who support the protest say it is to demonstrate what is lost when women aren’t permitted to speak, but who is there to point out what’s missing?

Twitter is one platform where women are actually heard and can create communities. This is especially true for women of colour, as demonstrated in these tweets. Which are on Twitter. And being read by you. Ergo, she is being heard.

It’s great to see such fervent support for women, but most of it was before the boycott began. While some have moved to other platforms like Instagram, the principle of boycotting a platform where you can use your voice and surround yourself with a like-minded and supportive community seems a little ill-conceived.

But keep up the girl power and support for female voices!