Entertainment Celebrity
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

If there’s one thing we know about Chrissy Teigen, it’s that she’s going to tell it like it is. Whether it’s political, personal or culinary, Chrissy is going to let you know exactly how she feels. One of the aspects of her life she’s been particularly candid about is her experiences with pregnancy. She’s shared how she and John Legend had difficulty conceiving, their rationale for using in-vitro fertilization, pictures of her stretchmarks and her battle with postpartum depression after their daughter Luna was born.

John and Chrissy welcomed Luna in April 2016 and the model is currently “‘want to build a dog house’ weeks pregnant” with their second child, a son. Chrissy and others who have used IVF to conceive have endured negative reactions in the past, mostly people who advocate for what they call “natural” conception. In 2015, designer Domenico Dolce (of Dolce & Gabban fame) made statements calling children born through IVF “synthetic.”

“You are born and you have a father and mother,” he told Italian magazine Panorama. “At least it should be like that. That’s why I’m not convinced by what I call chemical children, synthetic babies.” The comments sparked mass outrage and boycotts at the time and the designer, along with partner Stefano Gabbana, issued an apology shortly after. Teigen revealed on Tuesday, amid backlash against YouTuber Logan Paul (who posted an insensitive video related to suicide), that she still doesn’t wear the designer because of those comments.

The model used her personal boycott as an example for how one might make your ethical opinion known without calling for the “ruin” of a person’s career or life. After Paul posted a video filmed in Japan’s “suicide forest” that featured a dead body and trivialized the gravity of taking one’s own life, he received harsh online backlash and many calls to end his career. Chrissy didn’t claim to be sympathetic to the YouTuber’s situation, but wanted to advocate for a more nuanced conversation about what we do in the face of public “unethical” blunders.

In classic Chrissy style, she added that her argument might also be the result of watching too much Black Mirror, referring to the season three episode, “Hated in the Nation” where there are grave consequences for publicly shaming people on social media.