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President Donald Trump got a little bit of a surprise at the United Nations General Assembly Tuesday when one of his customary “Make America Great Again” rally speeches got a not-so-customary reaction. The president is used to his brags about himself and his administration garnering applause and cheering from a receptive crowd, but the world leaders and diplomats present at his U.N. address responded by laughing at his claims. Yes, actually laughing at them.

“In less than two years, my administration has accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country,” Trump said, “America — so true.” At that point, the president picked up on the faint but escalating laughter in the room.

“Didn’t expect that reaction, but that’s okay,” he acknowledged.

That was pretty much the only humourous part of Trump’s speech which focused mainly on rejecting globalism in favour of individual patriotism and encouraging other countries to do the same. He also reiterated his reasoning for pulling out of the United Securities Council last year and added that the United States will no longer recognize the U.N.’s International Criminal Court.

“As far as America is concerned, the ICC has no jurisdiction, no legitimacy, and no authority … We will never surrender America’s sovereignty to an unelected, unaccountable, global bureaucracy,” he continued, “America is governed by Americans. We reject the ideology of globalism, and we embrace the doctrine of patriotism.

“Around the world, responsible nations must defend against threats to sovereignty not just from global governance, but also from other, new forms of coercion and domination.”

It was harsh and divisive rhetoric for an event hosted by the United Nations.

The president went on to rail against global climate change initiatives; encourage other nations to isolate and sanction Iran; reiterate his point that other U.N. countries need to contribute more of their “share” of foreign aid and underline his hard stance on trade. It was a speech that plays well at his rallies in Republican states, but on the international stage just served to aggravate the people who are meant to be his allies.

And it looks like they’ve had enough. According to Buzzfeed reporting, several diplomats found the speech absurd.

“His words in the opening part of the speech were clearly addressed to [a] domestic audience. But as he did it in the Trumpian way (bragging ridiculously about being one of the best administrations in history) people in the audience reacted how they reacted,” they quote a European diplomat, in an article with comments from several others sharing similar sentiments.

A few key world leaders also used the United Nations stage to air their Trump grievances more publicly. Iranian president Hassan Rouhani said the U.S. president’s policies have “a Nazi disposition” and that he and his country cannot stand for POTUS’s “bullying.” Iran has been on bad terms with the United States since the latter pulled out of the Iran Nuclear Deal and slapped Iran with economic sanctions.

French President Emmanuel Macron also publicly took issue with Trump’s stance. Macron has been known to be both a friend and harsh critic of Donald Trump in the past. He argued that while it is crucial to uphold the sovereignty of individual nations, that can’t be done without collective action. He also emphasized the importance of pursuing climate initiatives as a globe. Though he didn’t name names, he was making a clear reference to the United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord.

“Nationalism always leads to defeat,” Macron said, before reminding his audience what intense nationalism and xenophobia led to in the past, “If courage is lacking in the defense of fundamental principles, international order becomes fragile and this can lead as we have already seen twice, to global war. We saw that with our very own eyes.”