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You may think that it takes a bomb going off or absolute terror to send someone down the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) spiral. But it doesn’t. People experience PTSD for so many different reasons—a horrific relationship or an experience of domestic violence. You could be vacationing abroad when, suddenly, there’s civil unrest all around you; it may be less common, but it happens.

When you see the words “trigger” or “trigger warning,” do you know what that means? It means that something depicted in a video or something written might contain words that will lead someone with PTSD to recount the trauma that happened to them. For the average reader, they are just words, but for someone with PTSD, it’s life. And it’s stressful.

In the video above (trigger warning: contains stories about domestic violence, rape and war), you’ll see various people discuss how PTSD has impacted their lives. Some will even admit they felt they weren’t worthy of the diagnosis, because they hadn’t been through a war. But they are worthy, because it’s happening to them.

PTSD is not something that anyone wants, but watching the video above will help you identify what it is, how people cope and why it’s a very real thing. It’s hard to live with but it’s not impossible.

It’s time we started talking openly about our mental health. Join the conversation on Bell Let’s Talk Day, January 31, and help end the stigma around mental illness. For every text message sent and mobile or long-distance call made by Bell Canada and Bell Aliant customers, Bell will donate five cents to Canadian mental health initiatives. The same goes for anyone sending a tweet using #BellLetsTalk, watching the Bell Let’s Talk Day video on Instagram or Facebook, or using the Bell Let’s Talk Facebook frame or Snapchat filter. But talking about it is just the first step: Visit letstalk.bell.ca for more ways you can effect change and build awareness around mental health.