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If you’re female with an unhealthy selfie habit, you’re OK. Guys, on the other hand, we need to talk.

According to USA Today, a new study led by Ohio State University professor Jesse Fox has found that dudes who take and post selfie after selfie online “tend to exhibit higher levels of narcissism and psychopathy.”

The narcissism we get, but the psychopathy?

Do we need to worry about all those guys who are behind the wheel with their sunglasses perched just so, giving a “Yo, what up?” with a peace sign?

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Or the ones languishing in bed?

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Or the dudes who pose in bathrooms, doing bathroom things no one needs to ever see like, well, this?

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And how about those (wannabe?) beefcakes flexing in front of the mirror at the gym? Well, that one’s never a good sign.

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Or the selfies where guys show they know how to “have fun” because they’re posing with a sizable bottle of alcohol?

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Is a phone with a camera an instrument or a weapon? It’s confusing, right?

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Right?

The study also found that selfies on their own aren’t the worst – it’s actually the men who edit their photos. (Hope that doesn’t include Instagram filters, because who doesn’t teeter between Mayfair, Valencia and Lo-Fi? Uh, but enough about us.) Apparently editing pics is merely an indicator of “higher levels of narcissism and self-objectification.” Fox explains that these men aren’t necessarily psychopaths, rather that “psychopathy is related to impulsivity.” Impulsive people, the study points out, wouldn’t bother wasting their time editing their photos. They just want them out there.

The study is based on data from 800 male participants between the ages of 18 and 40, all of whom completed an online survey about their selfie-taking addiction ways. The men also filled out questionnaires on anti-social behaviour and self-objectification.

All that being said, the university acknowledges that even though all the subjects exhibited higher levels of these traits, they were still all within the “normal” range. The study was published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, if you’re interested in reading it in its entirety.

Fox isn’t done with her selfie studies, and her next study will examine the relationship between a selfie-loving person and the online behavior of his/her friends, and how they influence all the photo-taking.

For now, boys, maybe just rein it in a little. Even you, James Franco.

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