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It’s that time of year again: when swarms of caterpillars cover anything and everything in Saskatchewan.

This past week, the campgrounds in Moose Mountain Provincial Park, Saskatchewan were suddenly overtaken by hundreds of thousands of tent caterpillars. Although caterpillars aren’t typically a bug associated with being a creepy crawler, the sheer number of the caterpillars all climbing on top of one another, completely covering any white space is something straight out of a horror movie.

Tent caterpillars are relatively harmless creatures (aside from their over-bearing, massive family gatherings) that feed on trees and build silk tent-like structures between and inside of trees. You can, however, get a bad rash from touching one, so only use gloves when dealing with these guys. It’s pretty clear that their massive population is becoming an annoyance.

Melissa Lebersback, a woman at the park, took a photo of a washroom door completely covered in them, begging the park to get rid of the bugs. And believe us when we say we’re not exaggerating about how many caterpillars there were.

Apparently, the staff have already done all they can, which isn’t enough to fight off these bugs from hell. The park staff get rid of the bugs and then only thirty minutes later, the bugs are back and rowdy as ever. In order to keep the caterpillar’s away for a while, they’ve been using environmentally friendly sprays.

The provincial park isn’t the only place that’s been taken over by caterpillars. Entire settlements across Sask. have been facing the aggravation of having caterpillars clinging to every surface.

Melanie Clark, a Canadian who lives just outside of Regina had to get rid of the bugs on her own property by the shovelful. “They’re dripping from everything, they’re everywhere,” she said. “It takes courage to go outside some days.”

“If each tree in Winnipeg has 100 forest tent caterpillars and there are 5 million trees, 500 million adult moths will emerge in July,” Entomologist Taz Stuart said.

That’s a lot of moths, right? But hey, at least they’ll turn into moths soon and fly away (or at least until next year, anyways).