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About a year ago, Loblaw introduced its line of “Naturally Imperfect” produce. Blemished, misshapen apples and potatoes were sold in specially-marked bags for up to 30 per cent less than their “perfect” counterparts. And while some Canadians may have been skeptical at the idea of buying “ugly” produce initially, the idea appears to be a success.

The company is now expanding its line of not-so-pretty produce to include peppers, onions, carrots, pears and mushrooms for consumers in Quebec and Ontario. Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, B.C. and Atlantic provinces, meanwhile, will see a mixed variety of those same items hitting select, Loblaw-owned store shelves.

It’s not really surprising that the product line is proving successful, especially in a time of skyrocketing food costs. But if you’re interested in buying some yourself, but concerned that the unsightly produce may not have the same nutritional value as the traditional “perfect” fruits and veggies–don’t worry. CTV News sat down with Nutritionist Lianne Phillipson-Webb to put those myths to rest.

“Nutritionally, [they’re] completely sound,” she said. “”It is exactly the same.”

The idea to sell misshapen and blemished food also cuts down on waste, which is great for the environment. Traditionally, these crops would be used for sauces and juices, but some were often too small to be harvested at all. The “Naturally Imperfect” line will put an end to that.

For more information, check out the video above.